One last look…


… before the frog pond.

I vow to DO A GAUGE SWATCH. I didn’t before. I figured it was just a sock, how important could gauge be?

I have learned my lesson. ALWAYS swatch!

Now, how to do that when you are making up your own pattern, like how I am for my hubby’s hunting hat, I don’t know. Any suggestions?

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6 responses to “One last look…

  1. This post has been removed by the author.

  2. I’m not sure if I understand your question but generally, do your swatch (for something in the round do it round — though there is a way to do it flat and get the round results. I could email you this info if you’d like), measure the said object (head, foot), and with the circumference of said object and number of sts/in figure out how many to cast on. And just for ease I usually do about 10% less than the number I get.

    So if my foot was 6 inches around and I got 8 sts/in on my swatch I’d take 48 as my number to cast on. Then to take ease into account I’d probably co 44. So same idea with a hat — you’ll just need to figure out when to begin doing decreases and you can do that by measuring the recipient’s head. Gosh, I hope this helps and is much clearer than mud :o)

  3. That has to be so disappointing. I didn’t correctly swatch for my attempted sock and it was too tight at the top. It actually felt good to frog it because I had this bad feeling it wasn’t going to work out. “If at first we don’t succeed, try, try again!”

  4. Dana. Gauge is important. And you look cute with your puppy.

  5. I’m sorry I can’t offer any helpful directions on how to do gauge for your own designs, but Amanda is right, to swatch in the round if you are doing the project in the round, etc. I’m still struggling with gauge on this camisole and hopefully will hit a groove soon.

  6. I actually DID swatches before knitting my socks, but it took three pair before I figured out how to get it to fit my foot. So I’m not the one to ask about doing the math! But, I sympathize with you. Visit my blog for my own sock nightmare.

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